Carolina Aranibar-Fernández

Race Arts Democracy Carolina

What would it look and feel like to imagine a democracy formulated through decolonial-feminist-intersectional practices?   

What if democracy was a space for healing and nurturing; a place to unlearn the constructed language sustained under the pillars and laws of social and political inequalities?

 

Dates:

  • Introducing Carolina Aranibar-Fernandez 
    Race, Arts & Democracy Fellow, 2020-2021

    Virtual Zoom
    Wednesday, September 16th | 6:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m
    Free | Online | Open to the Public

    Learn More

 

  • Daring Democracy: A Student Workshop
    Virtual Zoom
    Wednesday, October 14 | 6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
    Free | Online | Open to University/College students only

    Learn More

 

Fellowship Statement

What would it look and feel like to imagine a democracy formulated through decolonial-feminist-intersectional practices?  What if democracy was a space for healing and nurturing; a place to unlearn the constructed language sustained under the pillars and laws of social and political inequalities? 

 

Through the lens of the arts, we can expand our language to understand, describe, and practice democracy.  The arts encourage the questioning of language and symbols, histories, and power structures that have been built on ideologies of racism, colonialism, and capitalism.  Art is a practice/place/space where we can re-imagine the different possibilities of a democracy--of liberation--a democracy weaved together with the voices, dreams, and imagination of the people whose voices and history have been left out. 

 

In my work I question systems of power that have been constructed to benefit some while purposefully marginalizing others. My research examines the exploitation of labor--through different industries that exist through multinational corporations. I seek to make visible the exploitation of land and labor, from the beginnings of colonialism--colonial matrix--which is deeply rooted in racism; to contemporary extractive capitalism--the privatization and extraction of natural resources and land--that continuously displaces people and other beings.  

 

Through the Arts & Democracy Fellowship, I hope to curate opportunities to explore the language of democracy.  The events, interactions and conversations I have proposed create spaces for dialogues and questions--the first layer for making and creating art. I hope to center the voices of women artists of color from across the globe; and to center the bodies of Black, Indigenous, and Latinx communities as a gesture of reimagining a new democracy.  

Carolina work 1 image

Photo Credit: Kathryn Ann Franklin

 

Carolina work 2 image

Photo Credit: Kathryn Ann Franklin

 

Carolina work 3 image

Photo Credit: Terry Brown